FCS Daily Music Video – ‘Penicillin Blues’ Stone the Crows (1973)

Stone the Crows was a blues-rock band formed in Glasgow in late 1969. The band was formed after Maggie Bell was introduced to Les Harvey by his elder brother Alex Harvey. After playing together in the Kinning Park Ramblers, their next band Power was renamed Stone the Crows (after a British/Australian English exclamation of surprise or shock).

Well stone the crows


Lyrics below.

Penicillin blues  - Brownie McGhee and Sonny Terry

Recorded by Maggie Bell with Stone the Crows 1973 - 12 bar in E (first change G, F#m, B then E run)

I’ve got bad blood baby, looks like I need a shot
I’ve got bad blood baby, looks like I need a shot
I’m gonna turn round baby, let you see just what I got.

I want you to be my doctor, Gonna throw my legs up against the wall
I want you to be my doctor, Gonna throw my legs up against the wall
Promise not to scream or wriggle, I want you to let me have it all night long

Whow

You’ve got your needle in me baby, and it looks and it feels alright
You’ve got your needle in me baby, and it looks and it feels alright
Don’t want you to lose none of that penicillin I want you to let me have it all
Let me have all that penicillin.

You’re ways are so lovin, and your skin is so soft, soft next to mine
You’re ways are so lovin, and your skin is so soft, next to mine
I’ve been all around the world makin honey, come on and mix it with mine.
Come on honey bee

I said a wha, ha ohh,  a wha, ha ohh
You’re soo good lookin as any man should be 
I said a wha, ha ohh,  a wha, ha ohh
You’re soo good lookin as any man should be 

I’ll make love to you for the rest of my life 
If you’ll only stay with me.
Wha oh oh oh – I want you to be my doctor

Don Matthews
February 2021



Published by donmatthewspoetry

I just like playing round with words. And having fun

13 thoughts on “FCS Daily Music Video – ‘Penicillin Blues’ Stone the Crows (1973)

    1. This is what I found: (another researcher)

      I’ve found mid-20th century references from England that describe it as an Americanism and American newspaper articles that call it ‘an old English phrase’. The dates of those are more or less right but not the locations — the phrase appears to have originated in Australia. Most of the early citations in print come from down under. It has a sort of Australian twang to it and is in common with several other similar phrases, all with the same meaning: starve the bardies [bardies are grubs], stiffen the crows, spare the crow

      Liked by 1 person

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